brand design

How to write a design brief

How to write a good design brief to get the design you want!

How do you get exactly the design you want? The ideal design you envisage in your mind, the one to take your business to the next level? A good creative design brief is the answer.

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A thorough design brief is the single most critical factor to ensure your project is successful.

What is a design brief?

A design brief is critical to the success of any creative design project as it provides the designer with all the relative information needed to exceed expectations.

A design brief needs to focus on the results and outcomes of the design and the overall business objectives of the project.

It should not attempt to suggest how the aesthetics of design could look… that’s the designer’s responsibility.

As a client, the design brief allows you to focus on exactly what you want to achieve from the design project, before any work begins.

A good design brief will ensure you get a professional design that meets your business requirements.

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How to write a good design brief

The questions below are designed to help you crystallise your thoughts and provide your designer with a complete creative design brief.

Please make sure you have fun answering the questions and remember, provide as much detail as possible!

1. What does your business do?
• What does your company do?
• What is your company’s history?

Tip: Don’t assume the designer will know everything about your company. Be concise and avoid jargon.

2. What are the goals? Why?
• What is the overall goal of the design project?
• What do you want to communicate and why?
• Are you looking to sell products or increase brand awareness of your product or services?
• How are you different from your competitors?
• Are you looking to rebrand or simply updating your promotional material?

Tip: Give the designer copies of all your current marketing material.

3. Who is the target market?
• Map out your target market demographics? e.g. age, gender, income, tastes, views, attitudes, geography, lifestyle of your potential customers.

Tip: If your market has multiple audiences, list them in order of importance.

4. What copy (text) and pictures are needed?
• What copy do you need to include within the design? Where is the copy coming from e.g.your marketing department?
• What pictures / photographs / diagrams etc. need to be used?

Tip: The copy and pictures used in a design are as crucial as the design itself and you should clearly state who is going to be providing the copy and pictures if needed. You may need to consider engaging a professional copywriter or photographer – ask your designer for some recommendations.

5. What are the specifications?
• What size / format is the design going to be?
• Where is it going to be used? On the internet, stationery, marketing brochures on your car?
• What other information can you give the designer?

6. Have you got a benchmark in mind?
• What other material do you consider would assist the designer. This could be your competitors’ brochures.
• Remember things not to do are just as important, for example styles that you do not like or wish to see in your design.

7. What Is your budget?
• Providing the budget upfront allows designers to advise if the project is going to be possible to complete.
• Providing a budget allows designers to match valuable time and resources to maximise your budget.

8. What is the time scale / deadline?
• Make sure you give the designer a detailed schedule of the project. Set a realistic deadline for the completion of the work. Always take into account the different stages of the design project for example consultation, concept development, proof reading, production and delivery.

Tip: Rushing a design job through helps no one and mistakes can arise, especially if a complex project is pushed through without time for reviewing it.

Occasionally, there are times when a job needs to be completed quickly. In these cases you should be honest and clear with your designer.

Now that you know how to write a good design brief, give it a go and email us!

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Your brand is more than your logo

Your brand is more than your logo. In a commercial context, brands are all about connecting customers to businesses.

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Your logo and its ability to send out the right signals about your brand and what it represents is an all-important connecting tool in your business armoury. But it’s not the only tool.

To make that logo as powerful as possible and to give it an appropriate context, it’s essential to first identify and define the heart of your brand, its purpose and its cause. This is what branding means in the truest sense.

I’d like to share with you, exactly what that means for your business. 

There are five key points to consider about your brand:

1. If marketing is how your business goes-to-market, then your brand is your Marketing Director, informing the focus of all marketing activity. From the products and services through to your people, your environment, processes and support systems – it encompasses your entire business proposition! Marketing without brand clarity is like playing the lottery, characterised by the highs (when you get lucky) and the lows (when you’re not) and having no idea of what’s working and what’s not. It’s a frustrating and inconsistent approach which doesn’t need to happen. Is your brand’s proposition clear and compelling for your most valuable customers and advantaged versus competitors and reflected in all your brand does?

2. Brands are all about making the right connections for your business. The right connections allow your business access to the right customers, the right channels, the right prices, the right territory in the market. Is your brand set up to make the right connections? Is it better at making those connections than your direct competitors?

3. Who are your most valuable customers? What are their needs? How does your brand address these needs, so it becomes the best solution for these people? Brands (not blands!) are defined by their actions. They stand for something clear and valuable to some and stand out from their competitors as a result. A powerful brand can clearly project what it represents and why that’s valuable to those it wants to connect with.

4. A brand is a promise, it’s not a logo. What does your brand promise and does it keep to it every time? What is its sense of purpose and how does that resonate with your most valuable customers?

5. What is your strategy to create tribes of Raving Fans – customers who love what your brand does for them, so they not only do they keep coming back for more want more but will also, crucially, willingly and strongly recommend your brand to others. Businesses that successfully and profitably create Brand Fans typically grow 2.5 times faster than those businesses in their market that don’t. Now that’s worth having and exploiting!

So, there’s a lot more to ‘branding’ than that all-important logo. If you correctly gear your brand to your business, it will become one of your most powerful growth enablers and you should be using it for all it’s worth.

Is your brand working as hard as it could be to take your business to the next level? We’d love to discuss that question with you and explore what more could be done – why not get in touch!

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Turquoise Creative – Steve Oakes

Steve Oakes is Turquoise Creative’s Creative Director
Steve Oakes has over 20 years experience in the branding and advertising world, providing creative solutions for the likes of British Airways, Coverzone,  DNA Logistics, Kent County Cricket Club, Interserve, Rentokil Initial, Start-Rite, Thorntons Chocolates and Yahoo. Prior to setting up Turquoise Creative, Steve held positions at Signal Graphics, Beacon Creative, Eurolink Consulting, TDG Integrated, Adare and the Purple Agency.

Steve Oakes is responsible for the creative output of the company, coordinating client presentations and the execution of the client marketing communications campaigns; maintaining profitability and delivering high-quality projects.

Steve is a creative person with a huge passion for his business while helping his clients succeed. He is a family man who loves working out at the gym, cricket, rugby, photography, travelling and spending time outdoors…. and of course, all things turquoise.

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https://uk.linkedin.com/pub/steve-oakes/6/8a1/884

Children’s book design

Tuxedo’s Tales is a fun and informative book for children of all ages. Bringing wildlife and the countryside to life through the eyes of Tuxedo. This book will take you on a magical adventure as I tell you all about my year in the Sussex countryside. You’ll read about the new friends I meet and the adventures we have together. At the end of each chapter is a Pearl of Wisdom which will teach you good behaviour, respect and consideration, as well as a few of life’s ethics and morals.

The book includes lots of beautiful illustrations by Katie Tunn. Think of characters with kind eyes, soft coloured drawings; think of a modern day Beatrix Potter and you have Tuxedo’s Tales.
I am a real horse I do exist. I am alive and kicking enjoying my retirement being cuddled, groomed, going for leisurely rides and enjoying lots of carrots.

As Tuxedo was a rescued horse, a percentage of the profits of the book will be going to Horse Welfare so they can help other horses to have a happier life. I hope you enjoy reading the book
You can buy my book on this website here.  www.tuxedostales.co.uk

To have a look at our work for Tuxedo’s Tales please visit :
www.turquoise-creative.co.uk/portfolio/tuxedos-tales-book

 

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Sochi’s Futuristic Logo

Anyone who has watched an Olympics whose vision is sharp will notice that the logo for Sochi 2014 — which appears in every stadium, on every ticket, and on tens of millions of dollars’ worth of Olympic merchandise — is remarkably different from those of previous Olympics. It contains no drawing and features only unassuming lowercase lettering, the five Olympic rings, and a web address.

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Guo Chunning, who designed the “Dancing Beijing” logo for the Beijing 2008 Games, has researched the history of Olympic logos going back to the beginning of the modern Games, in 1896. He believes that, with the exception of Mexico City 1968 and London 2012, this is the first time a logo has lacked drawn elements. (Mexico City and London, however, used lettering that resembled artwork.)

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Olympic logos, once chosen, aren’t always greeted with applause. When the London 2012 logo was revealed, in 2007 — having cost four hundred thousand pounds, or eight hundred thousand dollars, to create—a petition circulated in Great Britain that was signed by more than forty-eight thousand people to have the logo scrapped and redesigned. The effort never gained traction.

While the Sochi logo hasn’t generated a groundswell of opposition, some felt that an alternate design, by the Moscow firm Studio Transformer, would have been more in tune with the Olympic tradition.

What do you think? Left or right?

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