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Learn about what’s happening inside Turquoise Creative, along with interesting extras!

Brand case study: Sigma Partners

Sigma Partners

It’s a competitive world!

The results of a Google search for ‘Accountant in <your county> returns pages and pages of suggestions. This just confirms how competitive the accountancy industry is. Add to this the emergence of cloud technology, accountancy practices need to adapt and add value in order to stand out from the crowd.

Out with the old…

We met a forward-thinking team of partners in July 2016, whilst they were still trading as Wilder Coe. At the time, they were going through a restructure of the business. The evolution meant a complete name change was required and a new brand identity design that could incorporate two parts of the new business; the accountancy practice and the payroll bureau.

Sigma Partners

In with the new…brand identity

The steps to create a brand were completely unknown to the partners, so they were extremely happy to be guided by us throughout the process.

The name…

Firstly, we needed to come up with a new name. The name needed to reflect the firm’s experience as qualified Chartered Certified Accountants and their long record of excellence. It had to appeal to their target market; budding entrepreneurs, established businesses and individuals in vocational fields.

During a fun and energetic meeting, which we facilitated, the partners decided on the name Sigma Partners.

The logo…

The next step was to develop a series of brand identity designs playing on the sigma symbol.

Sigma PartnersThe uppercase sigma is familiar to those regularly using spreadsheets, however, the lowercase sigma symbol is not so well known and this is what we incorporated into the logotype to create a subtle but memorable identity.

Sigma Partners

The colours…

Research reinforces how important colour is when developing a brand identity:

  • 60% of the time people will decide if they are attracted or not to a message – based on colour alone!
  • Colour can increase brand recognition by up to 80 percent.

The dominant colours for the Sigma brand are green and blue.

Green symbolises life, vitality, balance and energy. This gives Sigma’s clients the reassuring feeling that they are qualified to assist their business.

Green is associated with growth, harmony, freshness, safety, and the environment.

Green is also traditionally associated with money, finances, banking and ambition.

Blue is a calming colour that denotes security, confidence, intelligence and trust.

Deep shades of blue are a sign of expertise, further endorsing the comfort that Sigma’s clients are in the hands of a qualified and skilled accountancy practice.

Imagery…

To reflect the local area where Sigma’s clients are based, landscape photography from around Mid Sussex has been used on the website, creating an energy and balance to the brand.

Sigma Partners

Consistency across all communications…

The new logos have been implemented across all communication channels, including stationery, advertising, website, signage and social media.

The lowercase sigma theme can also be seen throughout the website.Sigma Partners

The future for Sigma Partners

Sigma Partners now has a clean modern image and a new face to promote to their target market. Their new brand identity underpins how they help small and medium sized businesses in the Mid Sussex area to plan their business, handling all aspects of taxation from self-assessment to corporation tax, assisting in financial planning, audit and provide business consultancy.

“ From the beginning, Steve was fully engaged with the project and completely understood what we wanted to achieve with the rebrand.

All of the design concepts he produced were excellent and produced a considerable amount of dialogue between the partners!!

His vision and creative input was excellent and also keep the project moving and on track, whilst also advising on other items around the rebrand. We are all delighted with the outcome.”

What does your brand image say about you?

In order to flourish and grow, businesses need to evolve, just as Sigma Partners has done. If you feel that your brand no longer represents your business and you would like an informal chat to see how you can refresh or completely change your image, feel free to call us on 01293 886805 or email us.

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Brand case study: Autism Parent Empower

When Turquoise Creative first met Jo-Ann D’Costa-Manuel of Autism Parent Empower, other than an amazing vision, she had no tangible means to share her powerful message.

Autism Parent Empower was founded by Jo-Ann and Wayne and inspired by their own experiences as they dealt with the challenges they faced as parents with a child with Autism. One of the main problems they wished to address was that there was nowhere to access key interventions immediately.

Having collaborated with some of the best professionals around the UK, they created a 12-week programme, including all the elements they wish they’d had at the start of their journey but didn’t.

APE case study

Autism Parent Empower – The Brand

With so much energy and planning already gone into Autism Parent Empower they desperately needed a means to raise awareness among families facing similar challenges.

So, to do this Jo-Ann commissioned Turquoise Creative to create the brand. At the initial branding meeting, our discussions included the name, logo design and brand values. Turquoise Creative then went away and created the brand identity, brand styling and creative direction, which needed to be engaging, bright and memorable.

Following the branding meeting, the Autism Parent Empower brand identity emerged.

Since then, Autism Parent Empower has built up a big following of 13,080 likes on their Facebook page and spread awareness through the local and national community.

“Steve didn’t just hear our story, he listened to every detail. He felt our emotion, he witnessed our hope. He created an identity and brand which is simply amazing.” Jo-Ann D’Costa-Manuel

Turquoise Creative – The marketing collateral

As part of the awareness campaign, on 21st January 2017, the very first ‘Quiet Hour’ in a UK food supermarket was launched.

A variety of marketing collateral and exhibition materials was required for the promotion of the Quiet Hour as well as the programme and on-going brand awareness.

“Steve’s exceptional creativity and professionalism makes him one of the very best the industry has to offer.” Highly recommended from Autism Parent Empower. Jo-Ann D’Costa-Manuel

APE Calendar 2017 v.2

In addition to the brand identity and marketing material Turquoise Creative created:

  • Launch invitation and leaflet which was held at Houses of Parliament
  • Stationery
  • Social media branding
  • ‘Because I can’ a 16 page booklet – full of ideas, strategies, recipes and positivity
  • Promotional A3 Calendar
  • Pull-up banner
  • Flashmob postcard and posters
  • Corporate folder
  • Leaflets
  • Website design

You can take a look at some of the Autism Parent Empower marketing collateral here.

Steve, Creative Director of Turquoise Creative said, “This has been such a fulfilling branding project to work on. Jo-Ann’s enthusiasm is infectious. You can’t help but be inspired by their dream to help others. They now have means to spread their messages, grow their community and provide the help that families need.”

Are you ready to put the U and I in AUTISM…?

Jo-Ann says, “It is time to put control back in the hands of the people that matter the most – Parents. We will work with them and their child in the home, in the community and even in the kitchen. We will be by their sides to guide them, teach them and empower them. I have walked this path with my own family and feel privileged to share their journey and watch their children reach their full potential.”

For more information visit www.autismparentempower.org

Check out the coverage we got on the ITV News
http://www.itv.com/news/meridian/update/2017-02-06/supermarket-first-in-the-country-to-introduce-quiet-hour-for-autistic-shoppers/

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How can Brand Guidelines help your business?

extreme-brand-book

What are Brand Guidelines?

Brand Guidelines are a set of rules that explain how your brand works. You may have heard brand guidelines also referred to as brand standards, style guides or a brand book.

These guidelines typically include basic information such as:

  • An overview of your brand’s history, vision and personality
  • Brand identity guidelines including brand colours, brand typefaces and brand application.

Every brand, from the smallest business or startup, to corporate giants such as Adidas or Apple, need a set of brand guidelines and rules to maintain their brand identity.

Brand guidelines can be a couple of pages, or a few hundred. It is the thread that holds together what the client / customer sees from a company.

What is a Brand Book?

A Brand Book establishes the personality and visual elements of your company. It governs every aspect of communication from the company.

The Brand Book includes everything from the design of an identity or logo and how it must be used, to stationery design, marketing literature and the look of your website.

brand-book

 

The Brand Book is the basis of all communications on behalf of your company, including social media, advertising and graphic design. It is a document that establishes guidelines on how all aspects of your company’s brand will be handled. It establishes rules for creating a unified and identifiable presence for your brand or business.

The Brand Book helps staff correctly use and communicate the brand message. It outlines brand rules and the company philosophy. It also answers key questions such as: What is the correct use of the identity or logo? What images are associated with the brand and products? What are the brand colours and colour breakdowns?

A Brand Book outlines all the basic design tools that are needed to create all company communications.

Identity / Logo

Once your logo has been designed, it is vital to maintain its integrity across all media platforms. This includes how the logo is to be used, from placement to sizing.

Our Extreme Brand Guidelines do a great job in defining exactly how the logo can be used, outlining placement, size and surrounding white space. Remember, your logo is the one thing clients have to identify your brand. Make sure you maintain a consistent use of that image.

Typography

Brand guidelines - TypographyThere should be a defined style for every bit of type used by your brand, in print and digital applications. Typography rules must be clear and distinct.

Select a few typefaces that will be used in design projects. This may include one set of rules for print projects and another for digital applications. But make sure the typefaces have some common links. For example, many web designers prefer sans serif typefaces for body text whereas you may prefer a serif style for print. Find a commonality between the two. Consider a headline or ‘big type’ style that you can use for both types of design projects.

Most brands use one of two primary typefaces. Then select a complimentary typeface and substitute typefaces. Ideally, the brand should include no more than five typefaces and their usage.

Colour

Brand guidelines - PantoneA defined colour palette is one of the most important aspects of the brand book.

For example consider the Golden Arches of McDonald’s. Would you clearly recognise McDonald’s if the giant M was another colour? The Brand Book should outline each colour and how it should be used. The brand book must clearly define each colour by name and value. Give each colour values: (CMYK for print) and (RGB, HEX for digital projects). Also, specify Pantone colours for each of your primary brand colours.

Imagery

Guidelines for images are more than just whether you will rely on photography or illustrations or other types of graphics.

The Brand Book should explain how images will be sourced, edited in Photoshop and applied. Image guidelines should also define when and how certain types of images are used. Will the brand use photography or illustrations or a combination of both? Is clip art acceptable? How will images be edited? Will they be reproduced in duotone, full colour or black and white? All of these questions should be answered within the imagery guidelines.

Brand Book Checklist

Here’s a list of areas your Brand Book should cover:

1. Overview of brand, including history, vision and personality
2. Identity / Logo specifications
3. Typography
4. Colour palette, primary and secondary colours
5. Imagery specifications, including photographic style
6. Letterhead and business card design examples
7. Design layouts and grids
8. Printed brochure guidelines
9. Signage and outdoor advertising
10. Social media guidelines
11. Visual applications

Brand Guidelines Conclusion

In the creation of your Brand Book, think of how it will be used. Your Brand Book is a guide to how your business should be portrayed to your clients and customers.

Keep the guidelines direct and simple, but also think about how restricting they can be. Guidelines that are too strict can limit the creativity of designers. Guidelines that are too loose may result in multiple or disjointed brand identities.

Use your brand book as a starting point and establish a culture around it that allows designers room for creative thought, while maintaining the aura of the brand in a variety of projects.

Remember the ultimate goal of the Brand Book is to create a distinct and unified presence for your brand.

If you would like to create a set of Brand Guidelines, please contact Steve Oakes on 01293 886805 or  07813 339789 or email us.

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What does the typeface say about your brand?

typeface

The role of typography is twofold:

  1. To clearly connect with your customers and
  2. Accurately reflect the character of your brand

Just as colours play an important role in the communication of your brand, so too does the typeface.

Using a default font on your logo, for example, could be seen as lack of attention to detail or cutting corners on investment in your own business. Certainly not how you would want to be perceived by future customers.

Therefore, time should equally be taken to decide the correct typeface that will connect with your target audience.

Striking the correct tone

Different fonts express different tones. A care home would choose a font with a tone that expresses warmth and friendliness. A financial services company might choose a font that is more serious and professional. These tones affect the way your customers view your business.

The tone of a font has great power over how your brand is perceived. Remember when Google changed their typeface? The old logo design, created in 1999, was a serif typeface. The new logo is a colourful sans serif typeface called Product Sans. Much had changed within the business of Google and this is why they needed to change their logo.

Fonts express the tone of your business

     1.  Professional, luxury, knowledge or authority

A business that wishes to express these qualities will choose classic and traditional fonts such as serifs.

     2.  Straightforward and functional

A business that wishes to express these qualities will choose modern sans serifs that are trendy and simplistic.

     3.  Reliable and approachable

A business that wishes to express these qualities will choose elegant, thin or narrow fonts.

     4.  Warm, friendly or even dramatic

A business that wishes to express these qualities will choose bold fonts.

     5.  Fun, outgoing or emotional

A business that wishes to express these qualities will choose handwritten or scripted fonts. These are not used within text as the smaller the size of font the harder it is to read. You’ll notice many logos use these types of font.

Streamline the fonts you use

If too many fonts are used the outcome is generally messy and confusing. The rule when deciding the fonts to use within your marketing material is to choose just a few. This will ensure your brand image is honed and streamlined.

3 font categories

      1.  Logo

As previously mentioned this should never by a default font such as Arial or Times New Roman.

Your logo generally creates the first impression and is the long lasting image that stays with your customers. It differentiates you from your competitors and sets the tone and customers’ expectation.

2. Heading and strapline

Your logo may not use a font but many logos incorporate a strapline, either way this secondary typeface should complement your logo.

The font chosen should be eye-catching, whilst remaining easy to read and can also be used for headlines and sub-headings.

   3.  Body text

The font for the body text of your marketing collateral is often taken from the same family as the main fonts. Again, this font should be easy to read as it’s likely to be small and used in larger blocks of text.

Readability is crucial, so a good tip is to choose a font that has generous spaces between the letters so the words can be read more fluidly.

Be Consistent

When you consider it can take many encounters with your brand for potential customers to actually connect, you want to avoid making this task even harder through inconsistency of typeface between different channels or media.

Choosing your set of fonts carefully with their use in mind and using them consistently will allow your audience to become familiar with your brand more quickly and make a lasting impression.
Think before updating fonts

Having read this article, you may now feel that your fonts do not accurately reflect the qualities you wish your brand to portray. If you do update your logo font remember to also update the other categories of font so that they all work in harmony.

Typeface talk

If you would like to have a chat about your typeface feel free to send me an email or call on T: 01293 886805  or M: 07813 339789

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Colour in branding

Colour in branding

How to use the power of colour in branding

Colour in branding matters in the world of brands and plays a pivotal role in all our visual experiences and communication.

Brands and colour are inextricably linked because colour offers an instantaneous method for conveying meaning and message without words. Colour is the visual component people remember most about a brand followed closely by shapes / symbols then numbers and finally words. People see colour before they absorb anything else. Therefore, most recognisable brands in the world rely on colour as a key factor in their recognition.

Research has reinforced that:

  • 60% of the time people will decide if they are attracted or not to a message – based on colour alone!
  • Colour can increase brand recognition by up to 80 per cent.

The influence of colour in branding

Colour bisects the worlds of art, psychology and culture, influencing behaviour and creates meaning both consciously and subconsciously.

Colour can be used as a communication tool to reflect our internal states both in a personal-sense (your choice to wear a bright turquoise shirt today), and in the worldly-sense (where cultures reject or embrace particular colours). Colour signifies motives and can even be used to shape people.

Colour is very subjective, and it varies from person to person. Over time particular colours can remind us of brands, feelings and moods. Our past experiences, along with being immersed in a culture which applies certain conventions to colour-use, contributes to this. As a result, we can study the generalised effects of colour on people and use this to better communicate visually with our audience. Since 1666 when Sir Isaac Newton devised the first colour wheel the psychological effects of colour have been studied and used to great effect within brand identity design.

What does colour say about your brand?

The following graphic shows how global brands work alongside their respective studied emotions of their colour.

 

Colour in branding

 

Tap into the power of colour to express your brand attributes and values

Have you ever wondered why colour is so significant in identifying brands? Red is associated with Virgin. Blue is the preferred colour for NHS, Ford and Facebook. These large corporations have developed a confident brand identity by using logos with particular colours.

Colour in branding also plays a vital role in retention, it stimulates the senses and delivers a message in half the time text does.

Colour in branding psychology is the study of how colours affect our emotions and decision-making processes. It is a sub-discipline of behavioural psychology since it studies and identifies behavioural responses to colours.

The branding process is very important. Defining your brand identity is critical as this will help you stand out from the crowd. Finding the right colour to best identify your brand is not as simple as picking out colours from the colour wheel, it takes time.

Identifying the most appropriate dominant colour to use is essential to the success of your branding campaign. Prominent colours significant to your brand, mission and vision must be apparent in all your promotional materials, which necessarily include literature, product packaging and exhibitions.

When it comes to deciding which colour to use in developing your brand identity, remember that it should be the colour that particularly relates to your brand and it should be able to set you apart from all other trademarks, especially your competitors.
A successful branding campaign can hinge on colour and how efficient, effective and persuasive it can be when properly used in visual communications.

Ready to inject some colourful flair into your brand?

Choosing the ‘right’ colour for your brand isn’t easy, but it is important, and you should spend some time choosing the colour(s) you think best represents your brand.

Start with these questions:

  • What words represent your brand’s personality?
  • What colours represent those words?
  • What colour suits the characteristics of your product / service?
  • What colours do your competitors use?

If you refer back to my previous article How to build a stand-out brand identity, colour can help create that unique feel, make your brand memorable and bring a feeling of consistency within all your marketing communications.

If you feel that your colours are not supporting your brand or sending out the wrong message, feel free to give us a call on 01293 886805 or email us.

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